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We’re funny (usually), controversial (sometimes) and insightful (always!). Our travel experts share their experiences below in hopes of hearing back from YOU. So read, comment and enjoy!

Posts in ‘Things to do in Spain’

La Tomatina 2014 – The World’s Biggest Food Fight

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It takes a special kind of person to want to get pelted by great big red squishy tomatoes.  Apparently there are literally tens of thousands of folks, around the world, who enjoy this treat.  So when August comes rolling around, they all head off to the normally quiet little Spanish town of Buñol (population: 9,000).  Once there, they take part in what is probably the biggest outdoor voluntary ketchup-making process – using hands, feet and other parts of the body to do so.

If you are planning to participate in this annual saucy affair, there are some things you should know about La Tomatina and its traditions.

La tomatina

Interesting Background Information

•    La Tomatina takes place on the last Wednesday of August, every year.
•    It originated in 1945.
•    Unlike other Spanish festivals, La Tomatina has no religious roots.  It began when some young men were not allowed to participate in the Giants and Big-Heads parade.  They started up a tomato fight in the Plaza del Pueblo becoming an instant success.
•    The fun and games begin when people try to climb a greasy two-storey pole to get hold of a ham tied at the top.
•    The tomato fight takes place in the town centre – the Plaza del Pueblo.
•    Before the event a large number of trucks bring in the tomatoes (generally from the Extremadur area).
•    The actual tomato throwing begins at exactly 11am – signalled by the firing of the canon.
•    The tomato fights last exactly one hour.
•    There are no teams.  It is every man and woman for themselves.
•    The chaos ends when the cannon is fired again.
•    By the end of the fight about 140 tonnes of tomatoes have been flung, squashed and pulped.
•    The town authorities then move in with fire truck and hose down the square to flush the tomato pulp.  The acidity of the tomatoes ensures that the ground is sparkling clean.
•    Since the crowds (over 50,000 in 2012) have grown too large to be accommodated in the Plaza, the town council has started limiting the number of participants by selling only 20,000 tickets.  Each ticket costs €10.
•    No ticket, No Entry!  There is no place to watch the tomato fight.

Tips & Rules
Before you go slinging tomatoes you should know and understand…

•    Squash the tomatoes before you throw.  Others could get hurt.
•    No tomatoes can be thrown after the second cannon shot.
•    No other objects are allowed to be thrown.
•    Watch out ladies!  T-shirts should not be torn off (your own or others) but this is seldom heeded.
•    Wear eye protectors such as goggles.
•    Don’t carry cameras, mobile phones, passports or other important documents.  Actually don’t carry anything.
•    Don’t wear flip-flops.  Instead wear covered shoes that you can discard after the fight.
•    Wear old clothes, or clothes you aren’t planning on wearing again.

After the chaotic fight and clean up, Buñol turns into one big party place with wine, cava and sangria flowing with really loud throbbing music to dance to.  Some organisers and sponsors have taken to organising a La Tomatina after parties.  Incredible!

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Spain For Thrill-Seekers

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Spain has more to offer other than churches, beaches, food and festivals.  It has plenty of adventure activities to take your breath away and get the adrenalin pumping. These alternatives take you up in the sky or to the bottom of the sea.

isango! has put together 5 adventure activities of Spain that will make your Spanish experience a highly memorable one.

Western Water Park Magaluf, Mallorca
This wet Wild West themed park will challenge the daredevil in you.  It also has rides and slides for children of all ages so no one gets left out.  Some of the slides are really heart-stopping like the Kamikaze slide that drops you a sheer 30 metres or the Tornado, a knuckle-whitening whirling twisting rush of water.  The Crazy Racer and the Huracan are just as fierce and awe inspiring.

Western Water Park

There is also a mini theme park, Kids Waterland.  Just as thrilling as the slides, are the daily high diving shows.  The divers take off from 30 metre heights and display their skills with perfectly synchronised combined dives involving two, three and more divers at a time.

Deep Sea Fishing, Fuerteventura
The thrill of landing a legendary shimmering silvery marlin or swordfish is hard to describe or rival.  The island of Gran Canaria, especially Fuerteventura, are superb deep-sea fishing waters.  There are an enormous variety of fish to catch.

With the aid of multi-lingual instructors, you are sure to experience the excitement when your fishing line goes taut and you battle the fish at the end of your line.  In keeping with the sporting etiquette, you return the defeated fish to the sea.

Gran Canaria Adventure Tour – Jeep and Camel Safari
Changing gears you can indulge in one of the most exciting means of exploring Gran Canaria.  This ruggedly beautiful volcanic island hides a lot of its beauty, which can only be seen and experienced by going on a combined Jeep and Camel Safari tour.

Camello2 Gran Canaria

The powerful open-topped 4×4 jeeps and towering camels will carry you over rocky mountain tracks to the famous Masplomas Dunes, the lovely little village of Cercado Espino and up to the picturesque highlands of Soria.  The stunning views of the Pico de las Nieves, the Presa de las Niñas and the Ayacata will be the highlights of your adventure.

Scenic Helicopter Tour over Gran Canaria
Another fantastic way to see the Gran Canaria is by helicopter.  Even as you lift off, you understand why an aerial view of this incredibly beautiful island is the best way to see it.  As the stunning diversity of Gran Canaria’s natural features unfurl below, you will appreciate its magical properties.

The rugged volcanic landscapes have many moods and facets that can only be appreciated from the air.  The glorious golden beaches, picturesque villages, twisting, mysterious ravines and the grandeur of the Maspalomas sand dunes will simply take your breath away.

Aguamar Water Park, Ibiza
The Aguamar Water Park on Ibiza is the one attraction that rivals the rave parties and beaches for attention and attendance.  It is the largest on the island and has an exciting range of water slides and other features to either cool you off or set the blood racing.

Located just 10 minutes from Ibiza Town, the Aguamar Water Park has loads of slides for every age.  Some are gentle and slow while others have tight twists and scream-causing turns.  The five fabulous and popular ones are the Kamikazee, the Black Hole, the Spiral, Rio Ventura and the Spiro Tubo.  When you are done riding the slides there are a lot of restaurants to choose from and shady spaces to enjoy a picnic lunch.

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San Fermin: All You Need To Know

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Every July the historic and lovely town of Pamplona, in the far North of Spain, becomes a sea of colour and throbs to the sound of music, dancing and merriment.  It is fiesta time! The 8 day long festival is to honour San Fermin (Sanfermines), the patron saint of Navarre Province.  The fiesta for most, is the occasion of the famous Bull Run in Spain but is actually a combination of three ancient events – honouring the saint, a market fair and a bullfighting festival.

The San Fermin Festival is a time of mayhem, huge adrenaline rushes, vast wine consumption, dancing and non-stop fun.  It is a heck of a crazy adventure.  Here are some tips and information if you want to get the most out of your festival experience.

  • The festival is officially opened by the mayor, at 12:00pm on the 6th of July with the launching of a pyrotechnic Txupinazo rocket (chupinazo) from the city hall balcony.  Thousands gather in the square to witness the event.

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  • The most famous event of the fiesta is the running of the bulls, properly called “encierro.”  The first running takes place the day after the opening ceremony.
  • The main festival is on 7th July.  The statue of San Fermin is paraded through the streets of old Pamplona accompanied by dancers and entertainers performing the Jota (an ancient dance).
  • The Giant’s Parade takes place every day of the festival.  Huge papier-mâché puppets manipulated by people dancing inside them are part of the procession.
  • Encierro takes place every day at 8am.  A firecracker signals the release of the bulls from their corral.
  • Just before the Pamplona Bull Run starts, runners (wearing red bandanas around their necks) gather around the statue of San Fermin and sing a traditional chant three times.  This is a prayer for protection.
  • The run involves six fighting bulls and six steers down the narrow streets of old Pamplona.  The route is 825 metres long and ends in Pamplona’s Bullring.

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  • The bulls are killed later in the afternoon at the bullfights.
  • At 11:59pm on a random night crowds gather at the Town Hall to make as much noise as possible with drums, horns, whistles or anything they can lay their hands on.  The din or El Struendo (The Roar) goes on for several hours.
  • There are spectacular fireworks every night at the Citadel Park.
  • The San Fermin festival also has traditional Basque sports every morning in the Plaza de los Fueros, near the Citadel.  They are stone lifting, wood cutting and hay baling.
  • On the last night people gather once again at the Town Hall Square at midnight, 14th July.  The sad Pobre de Mi (Poor Me) is sung, candles are lit and the people remove the red bandanas from their necks.

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4 Reasons Why Barcelona Is Great To Visit In Summers

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Every summer there comes that time when you have to decide where to spend your vacation. Most often the decision making is compounded by what to do. The ‘where’ and the ‘what’ can often cause head scratching. This is where Barcelona scores on every level.

Let’s see now. The weather is warm in summer and just right. There are miles of soft sandy beaches; a hectic nightlife fuelled by a huge variety of bars, discotheques and clubs; entertainment in the form of concerts and fiestas; unbeatable cuisine – Catalan and international; natural beauty with a gorgeous coastline and nearby craggy mountains; an extraordinarily rich culture seen on every street and in museums. There is plenty more, of course, but above all there is endless sunshine!

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Without attempting to push any particular itinerary, here is an outline that encapsulates what you can see and do in Barcelona in the summer!

Beaches
If you are looking to just lay back, get a tan, not do much and release those work-related tensions then the beaches of Barcelona are just the ticket. There are five notable ones with individual characteristics.

Barceloneta Beach is the closest to the city centre with attractive beach shacks serving great cuisine. Nova Icària, is the prettiest and most popular beach with plenty of good restaurants. Marberlla is famed for its free-spirited and nude bathers. It has plenty of eateries and drinking places and easily accessible from the city. Sant Sebastià, the oldest, has calm waters and a long golden stretch of soft sand. Bogatell Beach is the most central. It is populated by the athletic and fitness types who can be found pounding the paved jogging paths and volleyball courts.

Antonio Gaudí
Honestly, this man is synonymous with Barcelona. His works dominate the skyline, are architectural benchmarks and epitomise the city’s Catalan heritage and style in a spectacularly original way. He has done everything from parks to churches. Seven among his brilliant creations have been designated by UNESCO as World Heritage Sites.

Barcelona Twitter Parc Guell

His works are worth visiting just to see what a brilliant and creatively unfettered mind he had. Some of Gaudí’s creations are the Casa Vicens (a private residence); La Sagrada Familia Basilica (his definitive work, which is still incomplete); Park Güell (his creative and spatial genius is evident here); Casa Batlló (displays Gaudí’s fascination with nature’s shapes) and Casa Milà (aka La Pedrera, is his most innovative, daring and religiously inspired work).

History
Barcelona can seem like a gleaming futuristic city but it has plenty of history. Many remnants of its past are still in well-preserved condition and can be seen all over the city. The best and most convenient place to see examples of Barcelona’s past are in the Barri Gòtic (Gothic Quarter). The heart of the city, this area has buildings dating to Roman and Medieval times. The beautiful narrow winding picturesque streets are worth wandering through. Highlights of the Quarter are the remains of the squared Roman Wall near Tapineria, Avinguda de la Catedral and Plaça Nova to the west, Carrer de la Palla to the south and El Call, the medieval Jewish quarter.

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Just an hour’s travel out of Barcelona is the magnificent Montserrat Basilica and monastery. The Basilica is where the famed Montserrat Boy’s Choir (l’Escolania) sing every day at 1pm. Across the Basilica and underground is an extraordinary museum with a superb collection of paintings by the likes of El Greco, Caravaggio, Sisley, Picasso and Dalí and valuable artefacts and items from ancient Egypt.

Entertainment
When your day of sightseeing or beachcombing is done the evening and night beckons and there is plenty to fill those hours. There is entertainment and leisure to suit all tastes and budgets.

You can have dinner while taking in a Flamenco show at one of the several notable tableaux. Barcelona is absolutely crammed with a variety of pretty and traditional tapas bars where you can treat your palette and sip on some excellent wine or beer.

La Ramba, one of the most famous and interesting boulevards in Europe is a super place to spend the night hours. This pedestrian only avenue is packed with buskers, living statues, mimes, artists and salespeople selling everything from lottery tickets to jewellery. There are plenty of bars and restaurants.

Barcelona has everything to give you that satisfied feeling of having had a real good holiday.

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5 Must-Have Madrid Experiences

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Madrid is one of the prettiest cities in Europe. It has a wonderful mix of the modern and the historic with many classic buildings rubbing shoulders with the finest examples of modern architecture. The Manzanares River runs through its centre making it even more attractive.

Right from Roman times the city has been a colourful, vibrant and happening place. Performances of classical and rock music concerts, cultural festivals, artistic and fashion events are held quite frequently here. Sports, especially football, is given a lot of importance in Madrid. There is never a dull moment in this city and with so much on offer it can be difficult to decide on what to see and do.

Our pick of Madrid’s foremost activities and attractions should help you out.

Flamenco Dancing

flamenco twitter

This iconic Spanish art form should be on their postage stamps or currency notes. The body-swirling, foot-tapping, high-tempo, pulse-raising baile (dance) is dramatically enhanced by the music and rhythmic palmas (clapping). Once experienced, a flamenco show is never forgotten.

Madrid has hundreds of flamenco dance academies and many of them put on regular shows. Flamenco can be seen and heard in theatres, tablaos, taverns and bars so finding a performance is not a problem. A few places such as Corral de la Moreria, Cardamomo and Las Carboneras are deservedly famous for the quality of their performances. At one of these premier tablaos you can sit down to a plate of tapas, a glass of wine and soak in the flamenco atmosphere.

The Gardens of Madrid

Madrid has more than 33 million square metres dedicated to 40 parks and gardens. The amazing amount of acreage makes it Europe’s ‘greenest’ city. When the day grows warm, these oases provide a wonderful sanctuary from the sun. However, Madrid’s gardens contain some remarkable sculptures and statues making them open air museums and art galleries. Some also house aquariums and a planetarium.

While locals have their favourites, the larger and better known parks are El Retiro (with its own lake) and the Palace of Velasquez; Casa de Campo (Europe’s largest park), which encompasses the Madrid Zoo and an amusement park and the Campo del Moro and the Sabatini Gardens. The last mentioned are actually the Royal Gardens opened to the public in 1978. The beauty and diversity of Madrid’s gardens ensure that you come away with a hugely satisfying experience.

The Estadio Santiago Bernabéu

Bernabeu stadium

This enormous stadium (the second largest in Spain) is a temple to the beautiful game – football! Just as significantly it is home to the legendary Real Madrid Football Club. As one of the most famous and sought after football venues, the Bernabéu has seen many a thrilling competition finals including that of the 1982 FIFA World Cup.

Besides the magnificence of the stadium itself, there is a museum and gallery filled with portraits of past (and present) football greats, club trophies and a wide collection of memorabilia that recall glorious occasions from the club’s history.

The Prado Museum

Prado Museum Blog

The Museo del Prado is definitely one of Madrid’s finest attractions and one of the world’s greatest art galleries. The museum has a stunning collection of artworks for its visitors to enjoy. The museum is a magnificent 18th-century Neo-Classical building and houses some 7,600 paintings, 1,000 sculptures, 4,800 prints and 8,200 drawings.

This enormous collection includes masterpieces by Velasquez, Titian, Picasso, El Greco, Raphael, Rubens, Bosch, Dürer and Botticelli. The standout compilation, though, is by Goya. It is his works that make up a large part of the museum’s collection. The most famous (and controversial) Goya painting, The Naked Maja, hangs on the museum’s walls. This along with Velasquez’s Las Meninas is among the most popular works in the place.

Fiestas

Madrileños don’t need much of an excuse to get into party mode. And when they do, they dress up bright and fancy and give of their best. Some of the big festivities happen during celebrations for Dos de Mayo, San Antonio de la Florida and La Paloma. The largest and most frenetic festival is that of San Isidro (Madrid’s patron saint). Extravagant floats, bands, colourful costumes, street dancing and a series of bullfights are organised during the fiesta San Isidro.

Guaranteed great fun and excitement during all these celebrations!

Venga a Madrid!

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Fun things-to-do in Ibiza

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When the Phoenicians came to Ibiza around 654 BC, they sensed something of the island’s nature and named it Ibossim and dedicated it to their god of music and dance, Bes.  Since the middle of the 20th century it has lived up to its ancient name.

Young people, in their thousands, come from all over the world to gyrate and groove to the insistent pounding of electronic music genres like trance, rave, techno and house.  Ibiza’s fame as the party capital of the world is confirmed by night clubs that can take in over 12,000 dancing guests and 40 DJs.  Starting at midday these parties go on all night.

Ibiza

Flashing strobe lights aside, Ibiza town and the surrounding area is absolutely gorgeous.  You can either rent a cycle or a scooter to discover this amazing island at your own pace and off the beaten track.  Several portions of Ibiza including the Old Town are UNESCO World Heritage listed sites.  Some of these sites include the Phoenician settlement at Sa Caleta and the Ses Feixes Wetlands.  A stroll through the Old Town reveals why it was chosen.

Despite the numerous fabulous beaches on Ibiza, the Aguamar Water Park is one of the island’s most popular attractions.  A family destination, the Water Park offers a number of pools and bars and an excellent cafeteria.

On the historic side there is quite a bit to see in Ibiza.  For instance there is the 14th century Ibiza Cathedral, an excellent study in Gothic architecture.  Inside, the walls are covered with some fine religious art.  You can visit the well-preserved Phoenician tombs in an ancient burial ground.  The hypogeal (burial caves) contain over 3,000 tombs and are remarkable as they have been cut deep into the hillside.   There is also an on-site museum that contains amulets and other artwork that were found in the tombs.

Just 6 kilometres to the south lies Ibiza’s quiet island cousin, Formentera.  This is a really flat island and the sea can be seen from anywhere on it.  It is world famous for its pristine white beaches.  While most people come for the beaches, its crystal clear blue waters are ideal for snorkelling and sailing.  Cycling is a popular way to get around its 19 kilometre length.

formentera ibiza

Formentera also has a few pre-historic Stone Age sites and an ancient Roman road.  It is also famed for its beach restaurants that serve seafood platters, grilled fish and paella, which are among the best in the islands.

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In Salvador Dalí’s Footsteps

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Salvador Dalí was the master and greatest creative practitioner of surrealism.  During his life, Dalí lived and worked in many places in Spain. However, he spent most of his life in his home province of Girona in Catalunya. The region inspired much of his work and also houses the largest collection of his works in the world.
 
Whether you are out to explore the Costa Brava or to discover Dali’s works for yourself, travelling through the northern part of Catalunya will be one of your most rewarding journeys.

For instance, his birthplace Figueres (meaning ‘fig trees,’ which used to grow around it) is a picturesque town with winding streets, cosy cafés and a small yet picturesque ‘Old Town’ section and Square.  It is archetypical of a sleepy Spanish village.

Dali Museum-Its fame is forever entwined with that of its son Dalí and the Theatre Museum Dalí. This museum was built on the remains of a 19th century theatre and incorporates a tower from those ruins. The museum is Dali’s own creation and is reckoned to be the world’s largest surrealistic work.

Another attraction of the town is the well-preserved pentagonal Sant Ferran Castle.  It was built as a military fortress in the eighteenth century and completed in 1753.  It spreads over 5 kilometres making it the largest monument in Catalunya.

Not far from Figueres is the fishing village of Cadaques, another Catalunya gem, which has Dalí connections.  Its white-washed Mediterranean houses, quiet streets, beautiful beaches and the perfect blue waters of its cove simply grab your heart and make you want to stay back – many do and many did.  Some of its most famous visitors were Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Marcel Duchamp, Walt Disney, Richard Hamilton and Melina Mercouri.

Cadaques has an official population of around 3,000 people but at the peak of summer, many times that number visit and stay here. There are also some rather remarkable houses like the Casa Blava (Blue House) that are scattered around the town.

Dali statueCadaques has honoured Dalí by putting up a statue of him on the beach.  The statue captures his eccentric style, his manic yet haughty expression, his famous upturned moustache and trade mark walking stick.  It was in Cadaqués that Dalí first met his wife Gala in 1929.

Just a little way along the coast is Port Lligat, where Dali lived with Gala for over 40 years.  It is now a house-museum that is just as magical and stunning as the surrounding area. It comprises of several fishermen’s huts that Dalí and Gala joined together.

The house features a labyrinth of passageways and rooms, including his workshop, library, garden and a very lovely pool.  The tiny rooms are crammed with many of Dali’s creations including his last painting which he did not finish and paint brushes.

The highlight of the building though is the whispering room. The acoustics are so brilliant that you can hear a whisper from across the room – over 30 feet away.  The building and its gardens are ‘Cultural Assets of National Interest.’

Dali himself once described the area thus, "… as always, in the perfect and dreamy town of Cadaqués. There, alongside the Latin sea, I have been quenched by light and colour."  And so will you be when you are there.

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The Old City of Palma

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The city of Palma on the island of Majorca is an ancient one.  It has always been important in the history and culture of the western Mediterranean Sea.  That has resulted in a rich, diverse and, at times very tumultuous past.  That past has left behind magnificent reminders that are still visible, intact and available for visitors to enjoy today.

The best place to get a glimpse into Palma’s past is the Old City (or Old Town).  It is a charming combination of an intricate web of shady, narrow, winding streets lined by pink Mediterranean style houses and lovely gothic buildings mixed in for good measure.  Many of the houses are adorned with window boxes and narrow wrought-iron balconies, detailed metal carvings and overhanging eaves that add to its lure.

While there is much that is attractive and worth seeing in the Old City, it is the Cathedral of Santa Maria de Palma that dominates and receives the most visitors.  It is a very, very large and magnificent Gothic, neo-gothic, restored building that took about 300 years (1299 to 1601) to complete.  It sits between the Royal Palace of La Almudaina and overlooks the gorgeous Mediterranean Sea.

There are still some aspects of the town that are reminders of Palma’s Arab/Moorish past and their influences can still be seen.  Nowhere more so than the locality called Bany Arabs or Arab Baths.  You take a quiet street called Ca’n Serra that is close to the Cathedral to reach this small two-roomed brick building.  It dates back to the 11th century and was once part of a larger residential complex.  The bath room itself has a cupola, and twelve columns that were removed from some Roman era building.  The baths are surrounded by beautiful gardens – Ca’n Fontirroig.

Then there is the ancient and still operational fishermen and sailors locality of El Jonquet. The most notable features of this area are the old mills that overlook it from above.

Bellver castleBellver Castle is a unique structure because of its cylindrical form.  While not technically a part of the old city, Bellver Castle is quite integral to the medieval history of the city and the island.   It was built in the 14th century upon the ruins of a Moorish site and set high on a hill giving it fabulous (no doubt strategic too) views of the whole island.  This distinctive fortress has three large towers and a central courtyard and houses an archaeological museum filled sculptures of times gone by.  It has served as a residence for the Majorcan kings, a fortress and a prison.

While you stroll through this beautiful and old part of Palma you are bound to see a rather more modern addition to the area.  They are the rubbish bins!  They are attractive, like so much else in the Old City, and made of bronze.  These rubbish bins are made up of two sections – an upper cylindrical part where you place your garbage.  You turn a handle on the side, which then drops the refuse into the lower, rectangular storage portion.

When you are done seeing the area you could relax in one of the quaint little restaurants along the sea front and admire the view.

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Mirador Del Rio Sunsets And El Golfo Lagoon, Lanzarote

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Lanzarote is the most remarkable of all the Canary Islands.  The eastern most of the seven islands that make up the archipelago, its extraordinary landscape seems to be of another planet.  Great parts of Lanzarote are covered by ash and lava.  Lanzarote also offers a wide array of quiet beaches with fine sand unspoilt, beautiful bays and turquoise waters.  It has many spots that are undisturbed making for a serene environment.

Sunset at Mirador Del Rio

Of all the numerous scenic pleasures Lanzarote has to offer, its sunsets are the most memorable.  The island is not very large, which means that you can get a view of the glorious phenomenon from almost anywhere.  However, the most sensational views are to be had at the north of the island – at Mirador Del Rio.

Mirador Del Rio is a slight, rocky hill, which is a beautiful place to sit and watch the sun go down.  The salmon pink, orange and purple of the setting sun are complimented by other Lanzarote delights.  Sitting on the cliffs overlooking the sea, you will have fields of bluebells on one side and a panoramic view of the sea and its changing colours on the other.

The tiny island of La Graciosa, not far from the Lanzrote coast, adds further magic to the already incredible vista.

A picnic hamper with a bottle of one of Lanzarote’s many excellent wines are great accessories to accompany your viewing of the celestial special effects of the setting sun!


El Golfo Lagoon

On the opposite side from Mirador Del Rio, on the southwest, is another spectacular Lanzarote gift.  This is El Golfo.  It is the remains of a volcanic crater that has been broken into and eroded by the might of the Atlantic Ocean.  Inside this crater the lagoon – “Charco de los Clicos” – has emerged.

This semi-circular lagoon is intriguingly bright green because of the algae and minerals in the water.  This crater is one of the few and rare examples of hydro-volcanism, a phenomena produced by the interaction of magma or with salt water.  The concentration of special seaweed blossoms pretty well due to the extreme high salt content present in the lake.  This makes an oddly interesting contrast against the sand and rock formation of the crater.

The remains of the volcano are like a painter’s palette with grand brush strokes of black, red, yellow-green and russet layers of cooled lava.  The beach comprises of black volcanic pebbles interspersed with semi-precious green stones valued by jewellers.

The nearby village also called El Golfo is a lovely, small community that has restaurants where you can get some excellent seafood.  You can dine al fresco and enjoy the sunset.

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Al fresco Tapas Bars In Lanzarote

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TapasBefore we start out lets understand what Tapas is.  Tapas are a wide variety of mouth-watering appetizers or snacks of the Spanish cuisine.  It is not the Sanskrit word for deep meditation, though after a tummy-full of Tapas you might want to drift off into a very satisfied mental state.

Tapas can be cold or hot and of many different kinds.  From the humble snack it has become sophisticated.  In most instances, it is a whole meal in itself with diners combining several tapas dishes.  It evolved from light snacks you nibbled on while you sipped your sherry, chatted and waited for the main meal to arrive – to the main course.  Having tapas has grown into a ritual in Spain – a favourite one too.

Way back in time tapas would be a piece of meat (usually salty) like Jamón (cured ham) that would be nibbled on while sipping drinks.  Bars and restaurants then became creative in their snack-making and started incorporating ingredients from around the world.  The Romans brought the olive; whole almonds, citrus fruits and spices came from North Africa and the Americas delivered tomatoes, peppers, corn and potatoes.  All these edible incursions have turned the tapas into gourmet must-do.  

Its evolution continues with the regular use of garlic, chillies, paprika, cumin, salt, pepper, saffron, other seasonings and olive oil.  The fillings often include anchovies, sardines, mackerel, squid or a huge variety of produce from the sea.  These are all mixed in an infinite variety of combinations and accompanied by tomato-based sauces, with a number of types of bread including Boccadillo, the Spanish version of the baguette.  It is quite usual for bars and restaurants to have over a dozen kinds of tapas sitting in warming trays to temp and cajole you into ordering them.

Now that you have a much better understanding of what makes tapas, let’s move to its consumption and the culture surrounding it, especially on the island of Lanzarote.

Al fresco dining started out (more or less) in cooler climates where a sunny day was a good reason to sit out in the garden or and have a meal.  Al fresco is Italian meaning “outside” or “in the fresh air.”

The gorgeous warm and sunny Canaries weather of Lanzarote means that it is almost de rigueur for bars and local restaurants to have sit-out arrangements where dining is casual and encourages a party-like scene.  All the villages in Lanzarote have numerous al fresco and so do the beaches.  The bars in the larger towns place tables out on the sidewalks and pavements.

Enjoying a leisurely tapas meal at these bars is usually enhanced by fantastic blue skies, pink and orange sunsets and the magical scenery of the island.  Your happy taste-buds and the location that made them so, ensure you will remember the experience(s) for years to come.

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